The findings of the sustainable places and greenspace module of the Scottish Social Attitudes Survey were published by the Scottish Government in July 2010.

The report presents findings from the 2009 Scottish Social Attitudes survey on three key questions:

  • What are the key factors that people in Scotland think makes somewhere a good place to live?
  • What is the role of greenspace in particular in making somewhere a place people want to live?
  • What is the relationship between perceptions of greenspace in the local area and health, subjective well-being and social trust?

It also explores what people think about their local greenspace and how they use it.

key greenspace findings include:

  • Two-thirds (66%) of people in Scotland live within a 5-minute walk of their local greenspace. But only 53% of people in the most deprived areas of Scotland live within a 5-minute walk of their local greenspace
     
  • There is a strong link between the distance people live from their local greenspace and how often they use it. Half (50%) of those who live less than a 5-minute walk away from their local greenspace visit it more than once a week, compared with only 16% of those who live more than a 10-minute walk away
     
  • A third (33%) of people are very satisfied with the quality of their local greenspace; 46% are fairly satisfied. Being very satisfied with the quality of your local greenspace is associated with better self-assessed health, higher life satisfaction, greater social trust and a higher sense of community cohesion. 43% of those who are very satisfied with their local greenspace say their health is very good compared with 26% of those who are neither satisfied or dissatisfied or fairly or very dissatisfied. 

Sustainable places and greenspace, 2010 full report here

Sustainable places and greenspace, 2010 summary here

download the report

Sustainable places and greenspace, 2010 full report here

Sustainable places and greenspace, 2010 summary here

 

about the survey

about the survey

The Scottish Social Attitudes Survey involves circa 1500 interviews annually, with respondents selected using random probability sampling to ensure that the results are robust and representative of the Scottish population. The 2009 survey, which was conducted between April and September 2009, involved face-to-face interviews and a self-completion questionnaire.